In the Words of our Patients and Loved Ones…

“In February, 2021, my close friend Lewis Little died at his Redding home. In his final days, Lewis and I and his family received amazing care and support from your Hospice staff.  I continue to receive outreach from your Bereavement team, which I find very comforting. I sing with the Ridgefield Chorale.  Our Spring concert this May will include a video presentation of singers’ expression of thanks to people and organizations that supported them during the difficulties of the COVID-19 pandemic.  My intention is to include a photograph of myself holding a sign thanking RVNAhealth Hospice Services.”

– Margaret Sheahan

For more information about RVNAhealth Hospice services, please call 203.438.5555 or visit our website.

 

RVNAhealth Hospice Program Earns CHAP Re-Accreditation

During the week of September 27th, a CHAP (Community Health Accreditation Partner) surveyor was on-site in Ridgefield, conducting an audit of our Hospice program for re-accreditation; and reviewing our Palliative Care program for first-time accreditation.  It could not have gone better.Continue reading

Meet RVNAhealth Volunteer, Tiffany Lee

According to Tiffany Lee, if you have heart, anything is possible. Lee, a RVNAhealth music therapy hospice volunteer, would know. She is all heart. A Hong Kong native and second-year graduate student in Montclair University’s music therapy program, Lee is devoting her practicum, or field work, to hospice service where she brings the joy and unity of music to terminally-ill patients and their families.Continue reading

Meet RVNAhealth Volunteer, Elise Kohler

There is nothing sad about the hospice experience; it’s actually quite joyful. So says Elise Kohler, hospice music therapy volunteer and junior-year undergraduate at Montclair State University where she is working toward a music therapy degree. Continue reading

Not Feeling Too Festive?

The holidays, for some, bring cheer and hope of fresh beginnings as the calendar turns; for others, they are a reminder of loss and loneliness. In 2020, we have all been affected by loss in some way: meeting across screens rather than tables, faces obstructed by masks in public, and togetherness—or lack thereof—defined by a global health crisis. Continue reading